Monday, July 24, 2006

Monday Freewrite

Lucho Bermudez is a genius and great to believe in and dance to when the meterologist says the words "one hundred and ten." It's hot. The pavement could blister your feet and we could have Bush forever, terror on television and an endless blur of a shiny America where you are the only one who matters. Could you imagine? On the stereo, the drums remind me that lions still make kids laugh and that hips were meant to sway even if they have been replaced. What’s hip comes from the gut---the way you tell him to go to hell, how much you love the flute in a school of Les Paul aficionados, how googling randomly is not art although I'm certain it's fun. It's hot. And my beautiful daughter loves lions and green beans. Julie, thank you for the CD recommendation. Ella Fitzgerald singing "Old McDonald Had a Farm" is indeed worth the twelve dollars. Can you imagine? I bet Lucho Bermudez could. Have I mentioned that your hips will move and you will begin to believe (in) me? Fatherhood is a beautiful country. There are olive trees like Van Gogh's paintings saying something to the various temples & moons like we like it here. There are poems. There are lions. There is music everywhere you are.

4 comments:

jenni said...

I really like this write. It has heart.

You know, I was thinking this morning (always a bad sign) and I started to wonder if part of the reason art has turned 'inward' on the self is directly related to the idea of capitalism, and the struggle for personal identity when there is no more 'communal' identity. I guess this is both bad and good -- bad in the sense that it leads to a lot of naval gazing but good in the sense that it truly reflects the age we live in -- and all of us can identify with the painful loneliness of self.

Just rambling. . . sorry . . .

liked this though

Lee Herrick said...

I know what you mean. Capitalism and its democraticizing effect (a la YouTube, Lulu, etc) has had quite an impact. I don't know if that's what you're referring to, but that's what I think of...along with people like James Frey. As far as pain and loneliness, yes, most everybody can relate there. Not that I am for overt didacticism or pity-parties, but personal and/or even confessional writing/poetry is still interesting to me, as uncool as that may be.

oh, and thanks for the nice comment on the freewrite. There's really about three sentences in it I like, which I may keep and plant into another poem.

jenni said...

Oh I like it too -- and yea, I don't care if it's 'uncool' either. I tend to like it better than poetry that is not confessional because a lot of that stuff seems stilted, academic -- if that makes sense.

Lee Herrick said...

yep. makes good sense to me.